ECE 430 week 3 discussion 2 (PRICE IS SET.... PLEASE DO NOT ASK TO CHANGE THE PRICE)

profileOKCountryGirl1982
ece_430_chapter_7.pdf

3/22/2017 Print

https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUECE430.13.1?sections=ch07&content=all&clientToken=f1732646­72b4­545f­0718­c136d99d0c36&np=ch07 1/3

Chapter 7

Guiding Children's Behavior

© Purestock/Thinkstock

Learning Objec�ves

A�er reading this chapter, you should be able to:

Define important terms related to behavior management.

Discuss the behavioral and emo�onal expecta�ons for children at different developmental stages.

Share ideas for encouraging prosocial behavior in the early childhood classroom in order to set a founda�on for democra�c living.

Suggest ideas for guiding children when their behavior is especially challenging and difficult.

Apply appropriate approaches to guidance when crea�ng a curriculum.

3/22/2017 Print

https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUECE430.13.1?sections=ch07&content=all&clientToken=f1732646­72b4­545f­0718­c136d99d0c36&np=ch07 2/3

3/22/2017 Print

https://content.ashford.edu/print/AUECE430.13.1?sections=ch07&content=all&clientToken=f1732646­72b4­545f­0718­c136d99d0c36&np=ch07 3/3

Introduc�on An important aspect of the early childhood curriculum relates to children's behavior. Just as competence in academic subjects develops over �me, so does an understanding of appropriate behavior. Infants are not born knowing how to nego�ate the social world around them any more than they can understand how to read or classify plants. Thus, it is just as important for adults to be pa�ent with children's developing behavioral skills as it is to demonstrate these quali�es during academic lessons. In this chapter, the approach taken to guiding children's behavior will be a posi�ve one, with added sugges�ons for dealing with more difficult situa�ons.

An explana�on of some terminology starts the discussion, followed by a review of development applied specifically to expecta�ons of behavior. Because the children in your care are growing up in a democra�c society, the next sec�on will explain how democracy can be introduced at an early childhood level. Important to democracy are prosocial behaviors, and these are discussed within the same sec�on. What to do when the usual posi�ve approaches to guidance do not work, especially for children with special needs, follows next. To round out the chapter, we revisit the teaching models from Chapter 4, because no ma�er how excellent a theme, unit, or project, if behaviors are not planned for, success may be difficult to achieve.