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Supervising for Excellence Training Participant Guide Part One/Module One

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Supervising for Excellence Training Participant Guide Part One/Module One

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Table of Contents Transition from Peer to Supervisor:……………………………..3

Supervising for Excellence Training Participant Guide Part One/Module One

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Transition from Peer to Supervisor v Perform a supervisor self assessment.

v Identify the challenges related to transitioning from peer to supervisor.

v Develop strategies and skills for transitioning from peer to supervisor, including

peer support from other supervisors.

Course Objectives

Supervising for Excellence Training Participant Guide Part One/Module One

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Key Points:

 The transition from peer to supervisor is a critical time. It’s crucial to lay a firm foundation for future success.

 To do this you need to know your strengths and weaknesses as a supervisor. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses. The key is to utilize your strengths and

strengthen your weaknesses.

 The Supervising for Excellence Skills Assessment on the next two pages will give you an idea of your strengths and weaknesses as a supervisor.

Notes Transition from Peer to Supervisor

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Directions: Using the scale of 1-5, circle the number for each statement that indicates your current level of knowledge, skill, or ability in that area:

1 = limited: very little, if any knowledge, skill or ability 2 = little: have a little bit of knowledge, skill or ability 3 = moderate: have some knowledge, skill or ability and practice it in my work

occasionally 4 = good: have a good bit of knowledge, skill and ability and practice it in my

work daily 5 = excellent: have superior knowledge, skill and ability and can teach it to

someone else

1. My ability to understand what a worker needs from me and to provide that in an ef- ficient and effective manner is

1 2 3 4 5

Limited Excellent

2. My understanding of and ability to model a strengths-based approach in coaching workers is

1 2 3 4 5

Limited Excellent

3. My ability to create a positive climate where staff feel that their needs are being met

is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

4. My knowledge of skills and strategies for minimizing defensiveness and maximizing openness to feedback in workers in my unit is

1 2 3 4 5

Limited Excellent

Supervising for Excellence Skills Assessment

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5. My understanding of how to promote transfer of learning for staff from their training experi- ences is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

6. My ability to coach workers to improve client interaction, assessments, case plans and pro- ductivity is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

7. My knowledge of, and skills for, evaluating and addressing the quality of my worker’s inter- actions and relationships with clients related to the standards of a strengths/needs based practice model is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

8. My ability to effectively deal with resistance in those I supervise is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

9. My ability to effectively initiate corrective action when necessary is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

10. My knowledge of, and skills for, evaluating and addressing the quality of my worker’s as-

sessments, case plans, and decisions is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

11. My confidence in my ability to supervise people from a range of cultures is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

12. My ability to help my staff deliver culturally responsive services to families and children is

1 2 3 4 5 Limited Excellent

13. My ability to listen to a range of opinions without expressing judgment is

1 2 3 4 5

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Notes Transition from Peer to Supervisor

10

Managing Caseload vs. Managing People

v Managing a caseload: – Assess and

allocate resource needs of clients

– Coordinate client activities

– Implement procedures

v Managing People: ¯ Assess and allocate

resource needs of staff

¯ Coordinate staff activities

¯ Develop/implement procedures

11

Management Skills

v Scheduling several home visits in a week:

Time management

v Identifying new ways to meet client needs:

Resource Planning/ Problem Solving

12

Management Skills

v Work with colleagues in other agencies:

Networking

v Plan a case conference:

Organizing

v Doing all this in a day!

Multi-Tasking

PowerPoint Slides

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Mini Case Studies

Case Study #1

You’ve worked with this person for years and consider him a good personal friend.

You have shared a great deal of personal information over the years and have had

many social interactions outside work. You have now been promoted and will be

supervising this person directly.

Case Study #2

Your supervisor left the organization and her position is vacant. You and two other

people on your team interview for her position and you get the job. Your co-

workers are jealous.

Case Study #3

You are supervising a former peer. She is having problems getting her work done

in a timely fashion and the quality of her work is poor.

Questions for Discussion How would you handle each of these situations?

Or, if this has happened to you, how did you handle it? Would you handle it any differ-

ently if you had to do it again? What was the outcome?

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1. The part I LOVE about being a supervisor is: 2. The part I MOST DISLIKE about being a supervisor is: 3. When I first considered being a supervisor, I never thought I’d: 4. Since becoming a supervisor, the biggest way I’ve seen the job change is: 5. My biggest strength as a supervisor is: 6. The thing I feel I need to work on most is:

What I Expected Vs. What I’m Experiencing...

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Notes Transition from Peer to Supervisor

13

Performance Expectations

v Clear

v Concise

v Measurable

v Related to larger organizational goals

14

Consider History of Performance

v Have deficiencies been documented?

v Employee should have written notice of ongoing concerns.

v Include positive notes as well as problems.

v What are the circumstances around the performance issues?

15

Top Ten Reasons New Supervisors Fail

1. Ineffective communication skills/practices

2. Poor work relationships and interpersonal skills

3. Person job mismatch

4. Fail to clarify direction/ performance expectations

5. Delegation and empowerment breakdowns

PowerPoint Slides

16

Top Ten Reasons New Supervisors Fail

6. Failing to adapt and break old habits

7. Unable to develop teamwork/ cooperation

8. Lack of personal integrity and trust

9. Unable to lead/motivate others

10. Poor planning practices/ reactionary behavior

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