Final Paper

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Whattheprofessorwants.docx

What the professor wants.

OK. Hi, everybody. Welcome back.

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This is one of our last discussion sections. It's very weird how both fast and slow the semester goes all the same time.

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So today we're going to kind of split our time in the first part of class.

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I'm going to do a sort of introduction to the final paper for you.

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I'm going to I know you're still doing your transcripts,

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and I might not be ready to fully accept the fact that the final paper and I think that's very natural and rural.

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But I do want to introduce you to the idea I have. I have posted the prompt and the rubric so you can see those on blackboard and I'm going to go

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over them today so that you can have an understanding about what's going to be asked of you.

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And so you can start to use part of the back of your brain to think about that while you tend to the assignments that are currently in front of you.

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And then what we'll do is next week I will actually go through an example of what I'm asking you to do in the final paper.

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So today I'm going to talk about it in the abstract, the way that it's explained on the prompt.

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And then next week, that's going to let you that sinkage your reins a little bit, sink into your minds and spirits.

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And then next week, I'll actually take you through a full blown example where I actually use data, I use a text, I write topic sentences.

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I sort of show you what we're looking for you to do in this paper, because, as you'll see, this is different, is quite different.

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What we've asked you do in this class before. So it is using the whole new different kind of skillset.

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Today, what we're gonna do with the second part of our class is talk about the book, hard for the work.

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So we'll talk about chapters three and four today. I know that I haven't lectured much really about Chapter four yet.

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We'll do that next week. But hopefully you've read it so we can discuss it and we'll see it.

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We'll see what you guys are up for. You know, you never, never really know.

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But I'm going to try to kind of pass the baton to you a little bit more in terms of discussion leading and kind of generating your own topics,

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because I know I do want this to be a space where you all get to talk about what you care about and not just what I think you ought to care about.

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So we'll see how that goes. All right.

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But first thing to talk about the final paper before I do anything immediate, any concerns or questions or anything that you need me for?

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We're good. All right.

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This is the smallest discussion section of all time today, which is really nice because it's nice and, you know, I always say intimate.

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And as soon as I say that, I feel really, really creepy. But you don't any close familiar.

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Nice. All right. So let me switch screen chairs and I will start looking at the props.

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All right. That's a little bit weird. Sorry. OK, great.

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You should be able to see the prompt now. So.

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The first part of the prompt is the normal thing that you expect, right?

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The instructions,

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what got to ask you to do and this assignment at the bottom is some some very sort of strict guidelines about the actual form of the thing.

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And then it's followed by something you haven't had in past problems, which is a list of the topics and themes that you can choose.

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So as you can see, as I promised earlier in the semester, there are a lot of choices.

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And so I'm not going to go over each of these today. But one thing I'll ask you to do is go ahead and look at this list for next week.

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And then if you do have questions about particular ones you're not sure I'm talking

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about or who the heck wrote about that or heard about my life or whatever it is,

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we can talk about those things next week. So for now, the basics of the assignment.

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What are we asking you to do? So this is a chance for you all to put into practice the kinds of skills that

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we've been seeing embodied through anthropological texts all semester long.

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Right. So anthropologists go out, they talk to people.

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They ask a bunch of kind of silly questions and a few really good questions, mostly literally silly questions.

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And then they come home and they listen to their recordings and they transcribe them and they look at their notes.

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And then they come up with some ideas and they come up with the ideas in conversation with the ideas of other people who have written before them.

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Right. Others who have already talked about the topics that are related to their work.

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Right. So they they contribute to and build on the ideas of others. And that is how knowledge is produced.

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So we are asking you in society to do a little bit of that work.

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So you will be engaging with your transcripts and also with texts that we've read in the class in order to show how this new data.

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Right. That has never existed before. That you and the pursuit interviewed produce together.

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How those new data. Relate to express.

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Contradict other related ideas that we've already learned about in the class.

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So the very basics of the assignment is that you need to choose three themes or topics from the list.

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The big list, the bottom. And then you need to use data from your interview, which just means some of the stuff that was said.

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That's the data. Some of the things that the person said to you.

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And also. Texts that we've used in this class to discuss each of the themes or topics.

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So you'll have three topics then for each of those. You need to bring a piece of transcript.

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You can bring more than one if you want.

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But at least one piece of transcription, any to bring at least one idea from a text and discuss that text in relationship to that idea.

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So you can do this in whichever order you want to do it,

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although I suggest just for organizational purposes and for Adam and I understanding what you're talking about.

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You kind of want to pick pick a pick a pattern that you do, by the way, you do it.

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Right. Like the transcript first or the reading first.

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But for each topic readership topics, you have to explain how it was used in a particular text or several text.

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You got this class, at least one. So it's not enough just to say this topic was talked about by this author, period.

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Here's how it came up in my mind. My interview. You need to actually do the work to explain for us the role.

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But that topic. Right. Played in the broader project of the author.

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Why were they talking about that idea? What did what did that idea do for them?

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How did it progress their argument? So you do that for three topics and then for those same topics,

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you to also discuss the role that that topic played in shaping your participants experiences,

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their life, their memories, what they've gone through in their life and what they talk to you about in their interview.

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Right. So, again, I know this is kind of at a level abstraction, but when you when you look at the topics,

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you'll sort of see how they they're they're kind of hubs around which you can talk

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both about the experience that we just spent and about what happens in logical text.

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So because you're basically basically asking you to put your experiences and memories of your participant,

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the person that you interviewed in dialog with these texts.

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Right. And in order to do that, those things can have multiple kinds of different relationships with each other.

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Right. So I have three of them here in the bullet points here in the round.

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Bullet points are three. Just examples of what I mean by relationship.

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And I don't these are not limited to these three kinds of relationship. But these are just to sort of tell you what I mean by them being connected.

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So one thing you could do is you could use the three,

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you could use one of your topics that we discussed this class in order to shed light upon the role of this topic in the experience.

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You're participant. So just go down to a quick topic, for instance.

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Kerry's embodying sacrifice. Right. Kristin Janek's.

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You would want to talk about how she uses that in her text.

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What role care as embodying sacrifice plays in her broader argument.

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And then. You could talk about how when your particle, although your participant doesn't use the word sacrifice,

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perhaps perhaps thinking about care as a form of sacrifice really makes sense of what your participant was talking to you about.

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Right. They were explaining how they had given up a lot in order to find caregiving,

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that they felt like they had gotten 10 years older over the course of six months, that their back had gone out when their caregiving.

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But, you know, they felt like they were responsible for doing it because the person you'd care.

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That's a great example of thinking about how we can think about Kerry's sacrifice as sort of making sense of those kinds of experiences.

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So that's one type of connection. Another type this the second bullet point here.

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You can use the experiences of the person you interviewed itself to elucidate.

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So to make clearer or to complicate or to add to or supplement or even to contradict

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the way that these themes or topics were discussed in the text that we read in class.

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Right. So you could say, let's also get another topic. For instance, the clinical gaze we're here.

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This is one that we talked about pretty recently in the space together.

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You could maybe, just maybe you have an interviewee who is discussing how scene they felt by their doctor.

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Right. They went to the doctor and they're like the doctor. It was like when she looked at me, I just felt like she really understood me.

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And I felt like she wasn't just seeing me as a patient. She was really seeing me as a whole person.

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Like, I got that aid. You have data that say that because that's not usually have doctors appointments go.

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But if they do, that could be a moment when she could say while while my participant actually did sort of feel the clinical days.

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Right. They they they thought about the experience, what it was like to have their to have their doctor pay attention to them.

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It was not did not reveal the same kinds of things that were revealed by the topic, the kind of gaze, as you said.

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Right. So that's complicates it maybe contradicts it a little bit.

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There's lots of different ways that you can do that. And then third,

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you can compare and contrast the author's use of the theme or the topic with what you found was the case in the light of your experience.

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So this is, again, just sort of another version of the same thing where you could say in some ways it was similar, in some ways it wasn't.

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And I'm going to articulate for you what about life by participant kind of matches with the way that

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this topic was used in this text and in what ways it diverges from the way this assessment's tax.

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So those are just some examples to get you thinking about how you might connect things,

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you know, happen in somebodies life and ideas that you've learned about through text.

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Yeah. So I'll go through this, Rob.

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Nuts and bolts of assignment, biota, just pause for a minute and see how you all are doing.

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This is making sense. Do you have questions? No questions.

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Great. Thank you. Well, you look like you've understood everything perfectly.

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You look like wise, wise understanding people. OK.

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By the way, I have just opened the chat window. So if you're in a spot where it's not great for you to talk, you can throw things up in the chat.

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And I will be looking at that, too. All right.

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So things that your paper must do. I wish that I had put this in and read it because it's very important.

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Your paper must be structured in a standard essay fashion, which I know I've been telling you all semester, like.

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Don't do it. Don't give us an introduction. Don't give us a conclusion. We don't want them, like, don't give it to us.

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But we're asking you now to use those skills and to write a standard essay effort.

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Many of you, this lecture that you couldn't use,

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because Adam and I both know very well that actually many of you have been turning in standard essays anyway,

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because it's been because that's what you're often asked to do in classes. Right.

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That's kind of the normal type of paper. Right. So I hope that for many of you, this is just like a return to what you're used to doing for papers.

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But it is a divergence from what I guess you do in this class.

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So that's I will highlight that to you again, I'm sure, many times between now and the deadline.

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But just to have in your mind from the beginning, the paper is also longer than the ones you previous written this class.

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It is your your final paper. It is in some ways a culmination of some of the things you've learned in this class, although obviously not all of them.

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So we're asking you to write between fifteen hundred and two thousand words. You'll notice that that's also a broader range than we normally give you.

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So we normally ask you to write between eight hundred and eight thousand words. Now you actually have a 500 word range.

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And one of the reasons why we do this is because in the past we've pitched we've kind of defined for you what it is that you need to discuss.

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Write the the promise have been pretty particular in asking you to talk about specific ideas in this in this assignment.

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You all have different datasets where you all have different interviews that you did.

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You talk to different kinds of people about different sorts of things.

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And so there needs to be a little bit more flexibility in how much you have to write about them because of you.

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We're gonna have really talking to participants. Somebody is going to have ones that are not that talkative.

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Some of you are going to have participants who talk like so much about stuff relating this class that you feel like you're,

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you know, overwhelmed with how how related at all is somebody is going to the opposite.

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So there is a pretty wide range. That being said, we still are pretty strict about word count.

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So please do not because you have that wide range, there's really no excuse for going under or over.

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So please try to hit somewhere in that fifteen hundred to two thousand word range.

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This is hopefully obvious, but please submit it in word or PDAF format.

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In terms of citations throughout the semester,

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Adam and I have been really pleased to see as a group how your your attention to citation has really grown.

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It's been really nice. As you know, that's something that I really emphasized in my teaching.

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So it's been really lovely to see that you've been responding to that for this for this assignment.

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You need to cite one author.

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And when I say cite any properly, cite the way that we've been teaching put aside during this class for each topic or theme.

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That does not mean that you need to cite three total. You can cite just one author if you want.

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It may be that your interview really, really speaks to the work of one author in this class.

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That's fine. I'm not I'm not trying to make you speak to work that doesn't that there's not a natural connection with.

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So if you want to just to speak to one author's work, that's totally fine.

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However, you do need to cite that author at least once for all three talks.

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And they're kind of mirror image of that for the transcript.

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Is that you need to quote directly from your transcript using appropriate line numbers and other formatting, which all.

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I'll show you how to do that next week. It's very simple. It's just like citing from a a page number in a text.

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And you need to do that at least once for each topic. So for each topic, you have at least one text citation and at least one transcription.

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A transcript citation. OK. You can have many more. But the minimum is one each.

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And the assignment is due Monday, May 10th. I will emphasize this again throughout.

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But Adam and I are really kind of pinched for time at the end of the semester.

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Final grades are due. Not that long after the final.

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These are fairly long essays and we really try and give a lot of carers the way that we evaluate them.

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So we really can't accept any late work.

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We just don't have the time. We just won't have the time to grade it in order to get your calibrating.

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So please, please, please, please think ahead.

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You've got a while before they're due. Please try and aim for a date before a 10, because if something happens to your life, it's unexpected.

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Which, you know, have things happen all the time that are unexpected that we can't predict.

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We really don't want you to have to suffer because you couldn't control.

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So a thing you can't control is starting the work early. So please, please do that.

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We are accepting drafts like we did for the two writing assignments, because this is a very different kind of paper.

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I strongly, with all my muscle fibers in my body, encourage you to submit a draft, write.

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You have a pretty good idea out of what our standards are for the for their writing assignments.

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Right. You've seen our comments. You see the rubrics.

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You kind of have a sense of what we're looking for in a lot of ways is a very different kind of assignment.

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And so it would be very helpful to you to get direct feedback on that before you're actually getting graded.

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So when should we have the draft submitted by. Great question.

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Tuesday, May 4th. Yes, short.

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So I have this on the prompt and I, I'm just realizing that I think I didn't include it on the assignment in Blackboard.

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I'll just go and throw it in there. So you see the deadline, the bottom of page one, the F under the deadlines, the draft deadline.

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And just to go ahead and e-mail those to us, it's helpful.

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If you could just send one message and C.C., both Adam and myself that way we both see each other has gotten it right.

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And we will, of course, we are very aware of the fact that you're on the deadline.

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So we will try to get to the you know, the turnaround, the feedback to you as fast as we can.

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OK, so this is the other thing I want to.

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Emphasized before turning to the topics for just a second, is that this paper is worth 15 percent of your final grade.

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And I want to emphasize that because I think that there can be a lot of I think it's pretty well known that there is a lot of stress around finals.

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Right. We all know that. And this is a big chunk of your grade.

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But it's the same amount of of your grade as any of your writing assignments where, you know, it's big.

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So it's it's important. But it is. No, no way. Like a giant looming source of value.

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If you don't do awesome on this, you could still very easily do well in the class.

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So I want you to know as much as you can. Try not to approach it as something that could make or break you, because it's kind of not the situation.

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It's just another one of the assignments that we have in the class.

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And the reason that I designed the the weighting of the assignments that way is really to help the student stress for the most part.

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So I just I think whenever I see a syllabus that has like 30 percent or 40 percent the final,

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I get butterflies in my stomach almost because I just like that's a lot. I don't want to sign it.

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So I treat it so that no one assignment can make or break you.

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All right. So something like I said, I'm not going to go for the topics in detail.

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We can talk about them more next week, if you like. But I do want to say that if if there is a topic that you want to discuss that is from class.

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Right. From what we've read in class but is not on this list, that is totally fine.

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That is a part of the data analysis process. Right.

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If not every conversation that you've had about every interview that you've done is going to be able to be characterized by this.

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I'll be at long list.

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So if you would like to discuss a topic or one or two or three topics that are from class but that are not on this list, that's perfectly fine.

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But you do have to get them approved. So I have to approve them before the final paper, before you submit it.

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And that's really to help you. We really don't want you to think topics that will work and they don't end up working.

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And then your final paper is all wrapped up in those topics.

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So it's really just like a kind of safety check to run them by me.

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Make sure that I give them the OK. And that deadline, which is right above the list of the topics header, is the same as the draft deadline.

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So hopefully it says Monday. But it's not. It's actually Tuesday.

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Sorry about that. Tuesday, May 4th, both for the draft and any potential other topics.

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I'll say that that deadline is really what you think of this, like the latest possible time,

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because that is the time by which we need to have the topics figured out and approved.

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So if you send me one at eleven to date and I say, actually, no, that won't work.

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That doesn't really work. But like, let's discuss other options. Then, bam, the deadline has passed and we can't really do that anymore.

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This is to give you plenty of time to know what the topics are before you start writing, which is important.

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But so, you know, if you're thinking if you're looking at your transcripts and you're thinking about other topics,

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just reach out to me as soon as you can and we'll discuss them.

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One of my my big suggestions for this week is for you to once you've done your transcript and

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maybe had a minute away from the dharam stinking thing that you spent a lifetime working on.

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Heck of time work. Go back to it, reread it and start thinking, you know, it's kind of the back of your mind.

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Start thinking about potential topics.

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Gazing at this list, thinking what might be there the early you come up with the topics that you're going to be using for this paper.

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The more column you will be about the paper, the more you will know the direction you're headed in and the easier it will be.

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So sometime this week. Take a look back at your transcript.

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Take a listen back. Recording with this list out and just, you know, let yourself think about it.

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OK. I believe that's all I have to say about this today.