Compare and Contrast the Four Models for Proposal Development

REQUEST for PROPOSAL

FOR

SEMESTER PROJECT

Mental Health Service project

PREPARED BY

Your Name

Name of University

October 2018

PART 1

Needs Statement

Goals

Objectives

NEED STATEMENT

The rising international trend in the number of parents who separate or divorce is raising concerns about long-term consequences for child and youth well-being and adjustment to adulthood.

Separation and divorce may increase risks for negative outcomes in physical, mental, educational and psychosocial well-being during childhood and later, as youth transition to adulthood. Most children of separated and divorced families do not have significant or diagnosable impairments.

Most children and youth experience initial painful emotions including sadness, confusion, fear of abandonment, anger, guilt, grief, and conflicts related to loyalty and misconceptions. Although many children and youth of separating or divorcing parents experience distressing thoughts and emotions, the overwhelming majority do not experience serious outcomes. However, even small negative effects constitute a serious public health problem when multiplied by the millions of individuals who experience separation or divorce.

Due to the effect of the divorce on the kids, they tend to be stubborn and are wild and erratic in behavior which is usually harmful to the children. It affects their daily relationship, academics, and personal lives.

Divorce can increase the risk of mental health problems in children and adolescence. Regardless of age, gender, and culture, studies show children of divorced parents experience increased psychological problems. Divorce may trigger an adjustment disorder in children that resolves within a few months. But, studies have also found depression and anxiety rates are higher in children from divorced parents.

According to our research conducted, children of divorced parents scored significantly lower than children of continuously married parents on measures of academic achievement, conduct, psychological adjustment, self-concept, and social relations. More recent research continues to suggest an ongoing gap between children of divorced parents and continuously married parents. The negative impact of divorce can reach into adulthood and even later in adult married life, with potential increases in poverty, educational failure, risky sexual behavior, unplanned pregnancies, earlier marriage or cohabitation, marital discord, and divorce

The extent to which the negative outcomes associated with parental divorce reflect dysfunctional processes that arise before parental separation, such as interparental conflict and parental mental health and substance use problems 

Problems That May Extend Into Adulthood For a slim minority of children, the psychological effects of divorce may be long-lasting. Some studies have linked parental divorce to increased mental health problems, substance use issues, and psychiatric hospitalizations during adulthood.

There is an absolute need to help these children of divorced parents going through adjustments disorder.

What our program offers Our Mental health program is an essential service for children with these sort of emotional or behavioral challenges because it helps them to move through the system as their needs change while ensuring the delivery of multiple services.

One potential benefit of our healthcare management, in particular, is its effectiveness in linking youth with mental health services and continuing service contact. Our participants will receive our care management services by participating in more mental health treatment, regardless of the severity of their symptoms and socio-demographic factors, indicating that our Mental Health service program will be effective in maintaining the best quality services to these victims.

GOALS and OBJECTIVES

Goal 1 Assist victims of separated or separating families who are experiencing issues around family relationships.

Objective 1 To foster peer communication and social relationships.

Objective 2 To help these kids and youth to first of feeling comfortable about themselves

Evaluation Criteria 1 The participants must show signs OR have records of negative behavior.

Evaluation Criteria 2 The participant must be between 6 to 12 years of age who are victims of either divorced parents OR parent who are going through divorce proceedings

Goal 2 To be more involved in the program by being sensitive to the need of the participants.

Objective 1 To Encourage, teach and normalize positive feeling expression to the participants.

Objective 2 Teach age-appropriate skills to build self-esteem, foster self-confidence and promote children’s resiliency

Evaluation Criteria 1 Participant must show signs of maturity in this stage through relationship among peers and staff at the mid-program.

Evaluation Criteria 2 In-depth interviews to check the progress of the participants in terms of confidence and intelligence.

Goal 3 Improve children’s appropriate expression of emotions about their family situation and the resulting transition

Objective 1 To increase protective coping skills for participants who have experienced divorce or separation.

Objective 2 To build on the strengths of children, youth and families so they find safety, hope, and love.

Evaluation Criteria 1 The staff must give final approval on the growth of each participant as regards to love, care, and forgiveness

Evaluation Criteria 2 Participant must show a strong level of excellence in coping skills and tasks assigned to him/her.

REFERENCES

https://www.verywellfamily.com/psychological-effects-of-divorce-on-kids-4140170

Bax M, Gillberg C (eds) (2010) Comorbidities in Developmental Disorders. Wiley.

Birchwood M, Singh S (2013) Mental health services for young people: matching the service to the need. British Journal of Psychiatry, 202 (Suppl 54): s1–s2. Department for Education (2003) Every Child Matters. TSO (The Stationery Office). Department of Health (2000) The Mental Health and Psychological Well- Being of Children and Young People. DoH. Hughes N, Williams H, Chitsabesan P, et al (2012) Nobody Made the Connection: The Prevalence of Neurodisability in Young People who Offend. Office of the Children’s Commissioner.

Framework for Children and Young People’s Continuing Care (Department of Health, 25 March 2010):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3804638/

file:///C:/Users/tZoe/Downloads/Working%20with%20Children%20of%20Divorce.pdf

REQUEST for PROPOSAL

FOR

SEMESTER PROJECT

Mental Health Service

project

PREPARED BY

Your Name

Name of University

October 2018

REQUEST for PROPOSAL

FOR

SEMESTER PROJECT

Mental Health Service

project

PREPARED BY

Your Name

Name of University

October 2018