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Applied Humanities

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  2. 1 Theme: Introduction to the Humanities (week 1)  
    1. 1.1 Succeeding in This Course
      1. 1.1.1 Why a Webtext?
      2. 1.1.2 Four Keys to Success
      3. 1.1.3 Course Project: Analyze the Project
      4. 1.1.4 The Dance: An Artist and You
      5. 1.1.5 Four More Keys to Success
    2. 1.2 Learning to See
      1. 1.2.1 Off the Beat
      2. 1.2.2 How to See a Painting
      3. 1.2.3 Seeing Giotto
      4. 1.2.4 Seeing Rembrandt
      5. 1.2.5 Seeing Vigée Le Brun
    3. 1.3 Learning to Read
      1. 1.3.1 How to Read Literature
      2. 1.3.2 Reading Keats
      3. 1.3.3 Reading Plath
      4. 1.3.4 Reading Collins
      5. 1.3.5 Reading King
      6. 1.3.6 Reading Joyce
    4. 1.4 Learning to Hear
      1. 1.4.1 How to Listen to Music
      2. 1.4.2 Hearing Schubert
      3. 1.4.3 Hearing Mozart
      4. 1.4.4 Hearing Berlioz
      5. 1.4.5 Discussion: Learning to Analyze the Humanities
  3. 2 Theme: Introduction to the Humanities (week 2)  
    1. 2.1 Themes in Visual Art
      1. 2.1.1 Subject vs. Theme
      2. 2.1.2 Caillebotte
      3. 2.1.3 David
      4. 2.1.4 Velázquez
      5. 2.1.5 Kahlo
      6. 2.1.6 Seeing Connections
    2. 2.2 Themes in Literature
      1. 2.2.1 Forché
      2. 2.2.2 Hass
      3. 2.2.3 Woolf
      4. 2.2.4 Jātaka
    3. 2.3 Themes in Music
      1. 2.3.1 Wagner
      2. 2.3.2 Beethoven
      3. 2.3.3 Stravinsky and Vivaldi
      4. 2.3.4 Discussion: Overcoming Challenges
    4. 2.4 Review the Gallery
      1. 2.4.1 Course Project: Analyze Part One of Your Course Project
      2. 2.4.2 Art Gallery
      3. 2.4.3 Analyze One - Art
      4. 2.4.4 Literature Gallery
      5. 2.4.5 Analyze One - Literature
      6. 2.4.6 Music Gallery
      7. 2.4.7 Analyze One - Music
      8. 2.4.8 Course Project: Part I: Works and Theme
  4. 3 Theme: Examining the Humanities (week 3)  
    1. 3.1 Research Two Works
      1. 3.1.1 The Story Behind Assignments
      2. 3.1.2 Evidence and the Humanities
      3. 3.1.3 Start Your Research
      4. 3.1.4 SNHU Library
      5. 3.1.5 Tips for Efficient Research
      6. 3.1.6 Course Project: Part I: Choose Three Sources
    2. 3.2 Exploration Document
      1. 3.2.1 Course Project: Part I: Begin Your Rough Draft
      2. 3.2.2 Course Project: Part I: Complete Your Rough Draft
    3. 3.3 A Strong Foundation
      1. 3.3.1 Strong Support
      2. 3.3.2 Clear Attribution
      3. 3.3.3 Course Project: Part I: Add Your Citations
      4. 3.3.4 Course Project: Part I: Add Your Reference List
  5. 4 Theme: Examining the Humanities (week 4)  
    1. 4.1 Rubric
      1. 4.1.1 Review the Rubric
      2. 4.1.2 Exploration Sample A
      3. 4.1.3 Exploration Sample D
    2. 4.2 Experience and Evidence
      1. 4.2.1 Eye of the Beholder?
      2. 4.2.2 You Don’t Have to Like It
      3. 4.2.3 The Power of Patience
      4. 4.2.4 Experienced Eyes
      5. 4.2.5 Course Project: Part I: Turn in Your Draft
      6. 4.2.6 Discussion: Humanities and Other Disciplines
  6. 5 Theme: Impact of the Humanities (week 5)  
    1. 5.1 What Is Art?
      1. 5.1.1 Defining the Humanities
      2. 5.1.2 A Window on Culture
      3. 5.1.3 The Villain Gap
      4. 5.1.4 Art Makes Visible
      5. 5.1.5 What Is It a Picture Of?
    2. 5.2 Choices
      1. 5.2.1 Behind the Scenes of a Painting
      2. 5.2.2 Choices in Visual Art
      3. 5.2.3 Choices in Music
      4. 5.2.4 Choices in Literature
      5. 5.2.5 Choices in Your Writing
    3. 5.3 Going Public
      1. 5.3.1 Do You See What I See?
      2. 5.3.2 The Audience Is in Charge
      3. 5.3.3 Course Project: Part I: Challenges and Strategies
      4. 5.3.4 Discussion: Considering Your Audience
  7. 6 Theme: Impact of the Humanities (week 6)  
    1. 6.1 Humanities with Impact
      1. 6.1.1 Discussion: The Impact of the Humanities
      2. 6.1.2 The Most Valuable Company in the World
      3. 6.1.3 The Show and the Street
    2. 6.2 Complete Document
      1. 6.2.1 Course Project: Part I: Rubric Revision
      2. 6.2.2 Course Project: Part I: Complete Your Exploration
  8. 7 Theme: Human Culture (week 7)  
    1. 7.1 Draft Presentation
      1. 7.1.1 Analyze the Presentation Assignment
      2. 7.1.2 Searching for Leonardo
      3. 7.1.3 Course Project: Part II: Draft Speaking Notes
    2. 7.2 The Principles of the Humanities
      1. 7.2.1 Review the Rubric
      2. 7.2.2 Presentation Sample A
      3. 7.2.3 Presentation Sample D
      4. 7.2.4 Course Project: Turn in Your Draft
  9. 8 Theme: Human Culture (week 8)  
    1. 8.1 Convey Ideas
      1. 8.1.1 Show Us What You See
      2. 8.1.2 A Presentation Is Not an Essay
    2. 8.2 Humanities and Society
      1. 8.2.1 What Ads Sell
      2. 8.2.2 Hamilton Gains Currency
      3. 8.2.3 Historical Compression
    3. 8.3 Final Answer
      1. 8.3.1 Course Project: Part II: Rubric Revision
      2. 8.3.2 Course Project: Part II: Complete Your Presentation
      3. 8.3.3 Discussion: Challenges and Recommendations
  10.   Appendix  
    1. Allegory of the Cave, The
    2. Araby
    3. Art of Drowning, The
    4. Because I could not stop for Death
    5. Colonel, The
    6. Dinner-Party, The
    7. Don Quixote: Ch 1
    8. Don Quixote: Ch 2
    9. Don Quixote: Ch 3
    10. Don Quixote: Ch 4
    11. Don Quixote: Ch 7
    12. Don Quixote: Ch 8
    13. Everything That Rises Must Converge
    14. Everything That Rises Must Converge: “Let’s talk about something pleasant”
    15. Everything That Rises Must Converge: The further irony of all this
    16. Everything That Rises Must Converge: He was tilted out of his fantasy again
    17. Everything That Rises Must Converge: Julian was thankful that the next stop was theirs
    18. Frankenstein: Ch 5
    19. Frankenstein: Ch 9
    20. Frankenstein: Ch 10
    21. Frankenstein: Ch 11
    22. Frankenstein: Ch 12
    23. Frankenstein: Ch 13
    24. Frankenstein: Ch 14
    25. Frankenstein: Ch 15
    26. Frankenstein: Ch 16
    27. Frankenstein: Ch 17
    28. Hamilton: Act I
    29. Hamilton: Alexander Hamilton
    30. Hamilton: Act II
    31. Hamilton: Aaron Burr, Sir
    32. Hamilton: My Shot
    33. Jātaka Tales: The Hare’s Self-Sacrifice
    34. Letter from Birmingham Jail
    35. Letter from Birmingham Jail: Freedom is never voluntarily given
    36. Letter from Birmingham Jail: Two honest confessions
    37. Letter from Birmingham Jail: I had hoped that the white moderate would see this need
    38. Letter from Birmingham Jail: Perhaps I have once again been too optimistic
    39. London, 1802
    40. Meditation at Lagunitas
    41. Ode on a Grecian Urn
    42. Power of Patience, The
    43. Professions for Women
    44. Rose for Emily, A: I-II
    45. Rose for Emily, A: III-V
    46. Song of Myself: 1-11
    47. Song of Myself: 12-21
    48. Song of Myself: 22-32
    49. Song of Myself: 33-36
    50. Song of Myself: 37-43
    51. Song of Myself: 44-52
    52. Sonny’s Blues
    53. Sonny’s Blues: I didn’t write Sonny... for a long time
    54. Sonny’s Blues: I remember I was restless
    55. Sonny’s Blues: I gave up
    56. Sonny’s Blues: I found myself wandering aimlessly
    57. Sonny’s Blues: “All right,” I said, at last
    58. Stars Over the Dordogne
  11.   Index of Writing Templates
  12.   References
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Back Next Review the Gallery Music Gallery 2 Theme: Introduction to the Humanities (week 2) / Page 2.4.6 Music Gallery Objective: Review the music options available for your exploration document.

As with the literary works, just reading a song’s title and the name of the artist usually does very little to convey anything about the nature of the song. But it’s possible to “scan” or “skim” music in a way that is similar to skimming text. As you search for musical works to include in your exploration document, click the Play icon for each piece in this gallery. If it starts off slowly to you, or begins to feel repetitious, click further ahead in the recording to see how it develops. Check the total time of the piece to get a sense of how much of it you are sampling. This process should help you get a sense of each piece and decide which one you’d like to study further.

Vivaldi: “La Primavera” (loading) 00:00.0 ▶ -03:28

The first movement of Concerto no. 1, “La Primavera,” from The Four Seasons by Antonio Vivaldi.

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Antonio Vivaldi

The Four Seasons, Concerto no. 1, “La Primavera” (“Spring”) RV op. 8, no. 1: movement I. Allegro, 1723

Genre: Solo concerto

Era: Baroque

Performed by: The Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Nigel Kennedy

Recording time: 3:29

This first movement of the “Spring” concerto comes from Vivaldi’s set of four violin concertos depicting the four seasons. Each section of this movement depicts a different stanza of an accompanying sonnet describing things commonly associated with the season, including birds, babbling brooks, and a thunderstorm.

Wagner: “The Ride of the Valkyries” (loading) 00:00.0 ▶ -04:52

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Richard Wagner

“The Ride of the Valkyries” from Die Walküre, 1854

Genre: Opera ensemble

Era: Late Romantic

Performed by: The MET Orchestra, conducted by James Levine

Recording time: 4:53

Powerful music introduces the Valkyrie sisters in the third act of the opera as the goddesses fly through the sky on winged horses. The music enhances the dramatic action with a large brass section and catchy melody.

Schubert: “Gretchen am Spinnrade”