Training Program

profileemmanuebboyton
Chapter9Summary.docx

Summary

We began this chapter by discussing the importance of a comprehensive evaluation. We end it by suggesting that a comprehensive evaluation is not always necessary. Understanding what to consider before evaluating makes such decisions more logical and useful.

Evaluation can be complex and, in many cases, costly. For this reason, we suggested throughout this chapter that evaluation is useful and important, but not necessary at all levels all the time. Furthermore, good detective work can, in some cases, replace complex designs in assessing the validity of evaluation.

Deciding what training should be evaluated, and at what levels, will be easier if the organization is proactive. By examining the strategic plan, it is possible to identify those areas of training that require evaluation and the extent to which evaluating is necessary. Without such direction, the training department will need to identify its mission and goals as best it can and work from there to determine the training that needs to be evaluated. Even for a large organization, it is simply not practical to evaluate everything. All organizations need to determine what training they want to evaluate and how they will do so.

The Training Program (Fabrics, Inc.)

We are now ready to examine the evaluation phase of the Fabrics, Inc., training. We presented the training, and it is time to do the evaluation. In the design phase of the training process, one of the outcomes was development of evaluation objectives. Although we developed and implemented the training, it is critical to remember that developing the tools for evaluation needs to be done concurrently with developing the training, not after it.

Examination of the output of the evaluation phase of training indicated two types of evaluation: process and outcome. The process evaluation will consist of the trainer, during training, documenting what she covered in each module and the time spent on it. These results will then be compared with what was expected to be covered in each module and the time spent.

For the outcome evaluation, four types are identified. The reaction questionnaire for trainers will model the one that was presented in  Table 9-4  of the text. For the training itself, the reaction questionnaire is shown next in “Fabrics Reaction 1”.

For learning, we need to revisit the learning objectives to determine what is required. We need a paper-and-pencil test for measuring knowledge (objectives 1 and 2) and two behavioral tests to measure active listening and conflict resolution skills (objectives 3 and 4). More specifically, the first two learning objectives (and the others related to the training but not developed here) are accommodated using the paper-and-pencil test. The content of this test is partially represented in “Fabrics Paper-and-Pencil Test” on the next page. But first let’s look at the knowledge objectives.

Fabrics Reaction 1

Using the scale that follows, evaluate the training by circling the appropriate number to the right of the item.

· 1 = Strongly disagree

· 2 = Disagree

· 3 = Neither agree nor disagree

· 4 = Agree

· 5 = Strongly agree

Active Listening Skills

The training met the stated objectives.

  1

  2

  3

  4

  5

The information provided was enough for me to understand the concepts being taught.

  1

  2

  3

  4

  5

The practice sessions provided were sufficient to give me an idea of how to perform the skill.

  1

  2

  3

  4

  5

The feedback provided was useful in helping me understand how to improve.

  1

  2

  3

  4

  5

The knowledge and skills in this session were of value for my job.

  1

  2

  3

  4

  5

Circle the response that reflects your feelings about the pace of the session just completed.

1. Way too fast

2. A bit fast

3. Just right

4. A bit slow

5. Way too slow

What did you like best about this part of the training?

What would you change?

Comments:

Note: A similar scale would be used for each of the other components of training that were taught.

The trainee will, with no errors, present in writing the four types of active listening, along with examples of each of the types, without using reference materials.

The trainee will, with 100 percent accuracy, provide in writing each step of the conflict resolution model, along with a relevant example, without help from any reference material.

After watching a role-play of an angry person and an employee using the conflict resolution model, the trainee will, without using reference materials, immediately provide feedback as to the effectiveness of the person using the conflict resolution model. The trainee must identify four of the six errors.

Fabrics Paper-and-Pencil Test

Evaluation of Learning

No specific time limit is set for this test, but you should be able to finish in about one hour.

Answers to the questions should be written in the booklet provided.

Please read each question carefully. Some of the questions contain more than one part.

1. List four types of active listening, and provide an example for each.

2. List the steps in the conflict resolution model. After each step, provide a relevant example of a phrase that could be used to represent that step.

And so forth for as many questions as needed.

The next objective is partly related to skill development. Following are a number of standardized scenarios and guidelines to evaluate them. “Fabrics Scenario: Active Listening” is an example. But first, here is the objective.

When, in a role-play, the trainee is presented with an angry comment, the trainee will respond immediately using one of the appropriate active listening types. The trainee will then explain orally the technique used and why, with no help from reference material. The trainee will be presented with five of these situations and be expected to correctly respond and explain a minimum of four techniques.

Fabrics Scenario: Active Listening

This is read to the trainee: The following set of scenarios is designed to determine how well you, the trainee, have learned the active listening skills. There are three roles here: initiator, active listener (you, the trainee), and evaluator. The initiator is a nontrainee who speaks a conflict-provoking statement to you (the active listener). You, the trainee, listen to the statement, and then respond using active listening skills. The evaluator, who is trained in evaluating active listening, listens to your response and evaluates it based on the use of effective active listening skills.

Note: The following forms (initiator’s role, active listener’s role, evaluator’s role) are given to the respective people, with the active listener’s role being given to you, the trainee.

The next sheet is for the person playing the initiator.

Initiator’s Role

(The initiator is to be played by the same actor for all trainees.)

Instructions for the Initiator Beginning with scenario 1, read the sentence describing the scenario carefully; wait until the trainee is ready, and then read the comment in bold next to the Scenario in an angry manner.

Wait until you are told by the evaluator to move to the next scenario and follow the instructions above.

Test Scenario 1

You were just asked by your supervisor (the trainee) to serve on the same committee again. You are angry that they always ask you.

You start. Say angrily:

“OH, NO YOU DON’T. I’VE BEEN ON THAT COMMITTEE THREE YEARS IN A ROW AND IT TAKES UP TOO MUCH TIME!”

Test Scenario 2

Your supervisor just talked to you about following procedures. You think, Why me? After all, no one follows procedures.

You start. Say angrily:

“WHY ARE YOU PICKING ON ME ALL THE TIME? I’M NOT THE ONLY ONE WHO DOESN’T FOLLOW THESE STUPID PROCEDURES!”

Test Scenario 3

You were just asked by your supervisor for a second time today whether you will be attending the weekly meeting.

You say angrily:

“I ALREADY TOLD YOU, I CAN’T ATTEND THE WEEKLY MEETING BECAUSE I HAVE TO COMPLETE THE STAFF REPORTS FOR TOMORROW!”

And so forth (for a total of 5).

The next sheet is for the trainee.

Trainee’s (Active Listener) Role

Instructions for the trainee: This test will require you to respond to five different short scenarios in which you are a supervisor and you say something to a subordinate that elicits an angry response. You will be expected to respond using the skills of active listening. The description of each of the scenarios provides what you initially said to the subordinate. When you are ready for each of the scenarios to begin, nod your head to the initiator. At that time, the initiator will say something. You need to respond to the comment, and when complete, explain to the evaluator the rationale for your response.

Scenario 1

You asked a subordinate to continue working on a particular committee for another year. Listen; then respond using active listening. Nod your head when ready. . . .

Scenario 2

You just talked to a subordinate regarding the importance of following procedures. Listen; then respond using active listening. Nod your head when ready. . . .

Scenario 3

Today is the day of your weekly meeting. You asked if your subordinate would be attending the meeting; the answer was no. It is now time for the meeting and you call once more to check to see whether the subordinate can make the meeting. Listen; then respond using active listening. Nod your head when ready. . . .

And so forth (for a total of 5).

The next sheet is for the evaluator.

Evaluator’s Role

Instructions to evaluator for scoring trainee responses: Trainee fails the scenario if the response is focused on the issue instead of reflecting what the initiator says. For example, a poor (fail) response to the first scenario would be something where the trainee responds to the concern by dealing with the issue “But you are my best person for the job” or “You have to do it; I have no one else” or “Look, I am asking you as a favor to me.”

Appropriate responses reflect what the person is saying, as in the first scenario: “So, you’re saying that being on the committee interferes with your doing your job” or “You feel you have done your share regarding work committee.”

It is also important that the response does not sound like a mimic of what the person said. Although at this time we do not expect perfection regarding responses, the responses must, at a minimum, sound sincere. Refer to the tape recordings provided to understand the difference between what we consider mimicking and acceptable.

For each of the five scenarios, there is an example of a poor (fail) response and an acceptable response. When the trainee explains his or her response, we expect the trainee to be able to identify the type of active listening response used (paraphrasing, decode and feedback, summarizing) and why it was chosen. Answers to why it was chosen are intended to show that they understand the different methods, and thus any answer that does this is acceptable.

Scenario 1

The supervisor (trainee being tested) asked the subordinate to continue working on a particular committee for another year, and the subordinate responds. Listen to the supervisor’s response and grade according to guidelines.

Unacceptable response:

“I am willing to talk about reducing the work you have to do if you will be on it.”

Acceptable response:

“You don’t want to be on that committee again because it interferes with your work and you feel you have done your share.”

Scenario 2

The supervisor (trainee being tested) just talked to a subordinate regarding the importance of following procedures, and the subordinate responds. Listen to the supervisor’s response and grade according to guidelines.

Unacceptable response:

“You are not the only one I have talked to about this.”

Acceptable response:

“You believe that you’re the only one that i am singling out for not following procedures.”

Scenario 3

The supervisor (trainee being tested) called first thing in the morning and asked the subordinate if she would be attending the weekly meeting; the subordinate said, “No, I’m busy.” The supervisor just called again at meeting time to check to see whether the subordinate could make the meeting, and the subordinate responds. Listen to the supervisor’s response and grade.

Unacceptable response:

“The meeting will only be an hour.”

Acceptable response:

“You’re not able to attend the meeting because you are completing staff reports that are due tomorrow.”

And so forth (for a total of 5).

Note that we do not provide the test for determining the knowledge part of this objective, where the trainee is asked to explain his or her response orally.

The next objective is skill related and has to do with conflict resolution. See “Fabrics Role-Play Conflict Resolution” for an example of this. The objective is:

“In a role-play of an angry employee, the trainee will calm the person using the steps in the conflict resolution model, with help from a poster that lists the steps.”

Fabrics Role-Play Conflict Resolution

Read the following to the trainee: The following role-play is designed to determine how well you, the trainee, have learned the conflict resolution skills. There are three roles here: initiator, active listener (you, the trainee), and evaluator. The initiator is a nontrainee who starts off very angry at something you did. You listen to what is said and respond using the conflict resolution model. The evaluator, who is trained in evaluating effective conflict resolution, listens to your response and evaluates it based on your effectiveness. The following forms (initiator’s role, active listener’s role, evaluator’s role) are given to the respective people, with the active listener’s role being given to you, the trainee.

The next sheet is for the person playing the initiator.

Initiator’s Role

(The initiator is to be played by the same actor for all trainees.)

Instructions for the Initiator

· Read the role a couple of times and get in the mood suggested.

· Be sure you understand the issues, so you can present them without referring to the role.

· Once into the role, allow your own feelings to take over; if what the supervisor is saying makes you less angry, then act that way, and vice versa.

· Do not refer back to the role after the role-play begins; simply act the way you normally would do in such circumstances.

· Begin the role-play by presenting the points at the end of the role-play with anger.

· To elicit an assertive response, interrupt the trainee at least once after the trainee begins to present his or her point of view. If the trainee allows the interruption, interrupt again until the trainee becomes assertive and asks you not to interrupt (maximum of four interruptions).

The Role of the Initiator

Your name is Pat. You are the longest working machinist in the plant, with 25 years’ service. You taught many of those who are presently there, including most of those who were made supervisor recently. The company has been busy for the last number of years, and you have been called upon many times to provide the extra boost to get some projects out. You worked hard all your life and are starting to feel it in your bones. The work is getting harder and harder to complete, especially with the older lathes. With only three years to retirement, you are wishing you could afford to retire now. You are really worn out, that is, until you hear the news that the company just purchased one of those new computer-operated lathes. You feel confident that once you get to use the new machine you will be rejuvenated. In fact, the thought of getting to work on one of these new machines gives you goose bumps. You have not felt this excited in years. Actually, the thought of going back to school to learn about it is the most exciting thing, as it is making you feel young again. You are sorry that you missed today’s meeting at which they were going to talk about the new equipment, but your car would not start.

“Hey, did you hear the news?” your friend Bill called out.

“I don’t think so, what is it?” you replied.