Training Program

profileemmanuebboyton
Chapter8Summary.docx

Summary

First, we discussed the development of training. At this stage, creating a program development plan is crucial to ensure that everything that needs to be done is done. This plan outlines everything that must be done to prepare for training, from material and equipment to trainee and trainer manuals. Content learning points from each learning objective need to be highlighted to clearly identify what needs to be learned.

The type of training facility chosen is also important. Arrangement of the seating and closeness of the trainer to the trainees should be a function of the objectives of the training, not the design of the room. Also, noise levels from adjoining rooms or from outside the room need to be determined before choosing a training room. The proper training facility then allows the seating to be arranged in a manner that best reflects what type of training will be taking place.

We examined the factors to consider when choosing a trainer, and specifically an OJT trainer, because of the unique issues that revolve around OJT trainers.

Alternatives to development of the training were examined. After all, sometimes it is simply not viable to develop training. In cases like this, the use of consultants, prepackaged training, and outside seminars can provide a solution. This is especially true for the small business.

In the implementation of training, we first focused on some practical issues related to keeping trainees’ interest in training. Use of icebreakers, learning objectives, variety, and an example of a type of exercise to keep training interesting was discussed. Next we provided some tips for trainers in the execution of the training program. Preparation, importance of the first impression, what to consider at the start of training, and how to use the podium were all discussed. Finally, some tips on communication and how to deal with certain types of trainees were provided.

The dry run and the pilot program were discussed. Before implementation of a large training program, it is useful to have a dry run in which the material is tested to see how effective it is. This dry run is not an actual training session but a process of going through the material and determining whether it is doing what you expect it to. The next step is a pilot program in which the first trainees go through the training, but with selected supportive trainees, so they can spread the word about the training program in a positive manner. Also, constructive feedback from the trainees is solicited to put the finishing touches on the program before it is formally launched.

Fabrics, Inc., Development Phase

Recall that in the design phase for Fabrics, Inc., we developed objectives. The output from the design was an examination of the various methods of instruction and factors that affect learning and transfer. These outputs are now the inputs into the development phase of training. The process is to develop an instructional strategy, which leads to a program development plan. The program development plan includes developing instructional material, obtaining needed instructional equipment and facilities, creating or obtaining trainee and trainer manuals (if applicable) and selecting a trainer. Following are partial examples of some of these outputs, starting with the instructor’s manual.

Instructor’s Manual

First we will provide a section of the instructor’s manual that will take you through the start of the active listening training. This will lead into the practice sessions for active listening followed by an example of that material.

Instructor’s Notes

Timing

Points to be Covered

Reference

The question being asked is to get the trainees’ attention and involvement in determining the need to learn how to listen.

20 min

Ask the question “Why do we need to attend a training session on how to listen? After all, listening is a natural thing, right?”

As you get trainee involvement, record their responses on an easel sheet. When ideas have been exhausted, examine the sheet, compare it to the prepared easel, and discuss any that had not been thought of by the trainees. Tape both to the wall next to each other.

Easel points

· tend to believe that we have the correct answer so why listen to others; they need to listen to us

· message overload, too much going on at once

· >believe that talking is more important

· listening is the responsibility of the listener

· listening is a passive activity

Easel

Now ask for a volunteer to play a peer of yours at a meeting. When you have someone, set up the scenario of you two sitting in a room waiting for others to show up for a meeting. Progress on the task has been slow but sure. Ask them to respond to what you say as they would in a real situation.

Say “OK, now it is time for practice. I am handing out instructions for the practice sessions using Person 1, 2, 3; it is titled Handout 1. Now go to Instruction Sheet 1, and read the instructions to the trainees.

The volunteer will answer as most people do in situations like this as they move directly to dealing with the issue. Responses will likely be something like the following:

· So what should we do about it?

· We have made some progress.

· It’s not as bad as all that

After they respond, point out to all that this is a typical response, as most people move toward trying to address the concern in some way. Point out that what you need to do is provide support through active listening first, then move to deal with the problem.

Give volunteer the statement to read, and ask to reverse the roles and say that same statement to you.

When they read the statement, respond something like “So you are saying that we are wasting our time at these meetings?”

Handout with statement on it

Now ask for volunteers. To each one say one of the following statements. Then provide feedback as to its effectiveness regarding active listening. . . .

· I do not want to work with Bill on any more projects; he never does his share.

· You are always giving me unscheduled work. I can’t get it done.

· We tried that last year, and it did not work, so let’s not go there again.

·

Now you are going to provide the trainees with the opportunity to practice their new skill. You will need Instruction Sheet 1 to read from and Handout 1 to give to trainees while you read the instructions from Instruction Sheet 1.

Say “OK, now it is time for practice. I am handing out instructions for the practice sessions using Person 1, 2, 3; it is titled Handout 1. Now go to Instruction Sheet 1, and read the instructions to the trainees.

This is the end of the instructor’s manual example

The preceding example is a sample of what should be contained in an instructor’s manual. Now let’s turn to instructional material.

Instructional Material

Part of the training is going to involve trainees practicing active listening skills they have been taught. Following are the instructions for this (Instruction Sheet 1) and a sample of the exercise “Person 1, 2, 3,” which is an exercise designed to provide trainees with practice situations where they can use the new skill.

Instruction Sheet 1 (Instructor reads this to trainees)

“Now that you have seen how to use active listening in your response, we are going to give everyone an opportunity to practice this skill. To do this, we are going to put you into groups of three trainees. Each person in the triad will have a sheet labeled “Person 1,” “Person 2,” or “Person 3.” Now look at the Active Listening Exercise Instructions I have just handed out titled Handout 1, and follow along while I read it out loud.”

The trainer now reads the instructions from the sheet (Handout 1) going down to the third situation (Situation C) and then asks if everyone understands or has any questions. Once the trainer is satisfied that everyone understands their roles, she puts them in groups of three and hands out the Person 1, 2, 3 sheets, one to each of the three person groups, again asking “Are there any questions?”

Following are the instructions that are handed out for the exercise “Person 1, 2, 3.”

HANDOUT 1 Active Listening Exercise Instructions

Initiator: Begins the exercise with a conflict-provoking statement.

Active Listener: Receives the statement from the initiator and provides an appropriate response.

Observer: Watches the interchange between the initiator and the active listener. After completion, the observer gives feedback regarding the appropriateness of the active listener’s comment. NOTE: You have an example of an effective active listening response to that situation, so as an observer you can coach the active listener if necessary.

Each group member will be alternating among the three roles!

Situation

Person 1

Person 2

Person 3

A

Initiator

Active Listener

Observer

B

Observer

Initiator

Active Listener

C

Active Listener

Observer

Initiator

D

Initiator

Active Listener

Observer

E

Observer

Initiator

Active Listener

F

Active Listener

Observer

Initiator

And so forth

Following are the handouts for the three person groups. Each person in a group will receive Person 1, 2, or 3.

Person 1

Situation

A

Person 2 is the Active Listener

Person 3 is the Observer

You Are The Initiator

Your boss just finished giving you a lecture for not being at the job site.

You start. Say angrily:

“HOW COME YOU NEVER WAIT TO HEAR MY SIDE OF THE STORY. YOU JUST ASSUME I’M IN THE WRONG.”

B

Person 2 is the Initiator

Person 3 is the Active Listener

You Are the Observer

The active listener is meeting with a subordinate regarding their performance. The listener has just told the subordinate that her performance is average. Listen and provide feedback

Response example:

“YOU’RE SAYING I RATED YOU LOWER THAN WHAT YOU DESERVE.”

C

Person 2 is the Observer

Person 3 is the Initiator

You Are The Active Listener

A group of equal-level managers are meeting on a project. You believe that these meetings need some structure, so you have taken control of the meetings. Listen, then respond to the comment by saying:

Person 2

Situation

A

Person 1 is the Initiator

Person 3 is the Observer

You Are the Active Listener

You just reprimanded your subordinate for not being at the job site. Listen, then respond to comment by saying:

B

Person 3 is the Active Listener

Person 1 is the Observer

You Are the Initiator

You have just been told that your performance rating for the year is average. You are angry.

Say angrily:

“YOU ONLY RATED MY PERFORMANCE AS AVERAGE. THAT’S RIDICULOUS. I AM 10 TIMES BETTER THAN ANY OF THE OTHERS IN MY DEPARTMENT.”

C

Person 1 is the Active Listener

Person 3 is the Initiator

You Are the Observer

A group of equal-level managers are meeting on a project. The active listener believes that the meetings needed some structure and took charge. Listen and provide feedback.

Response example:

“SO YOU ARE SAYING THAT WHEN I BEHAVE THIS WAY, I’M ACTING TOO MUCH LIKE A BOSS.”

Person 3

Situation

A

Person 1 is the Initiator

Person 2 is the Active Listener

You Are the Observer

The active listener just reprimanded a subordinate for not being at the job site. Listen and provide feedback.

Response example:

“SO YOU’RE SAYING I NEVER GAVE YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO PRESENT YOUR POINT OF VIEW.”

B

Person 1 is the Observer

Person 2 is the Initiator

You Are the Active Listener

You are meeting with a subordinate regarding their performance. You have just told the subordinate that their performance was average.

Listen, then respond using decoding and feedback.

C

Person 1 is the Active Listener

Person 2 is the Observer

You are the Initiator

A group of equal-level managers are meeting on a project. One of these people has just taken control of the meeting, and you don’t like it.

You start. Say angrily:

“YOU’RE CONTROLLING THESE MEETINGS LIKE YOU WERE THE BOSS. WE ARE ALL EQUAL HERE AND I AM SICK AND TIRED OF YOU ACTING LIKE THE BOSS.”

And so forth

We will return to Fabrics, Inc., in the next chapter (evaluation) to complete the example. As you might expect, similar exercises appear in the evaluation chapter that are designed to measure how much learning took place.

References

Blanchard, P. N., & Thacker, J. W. (2013).  Effective training: Systems, strategies, and practices  (5th ed.) . Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.