SOCW-6302/6500-WK2-Response

profilecheyka

Discussion 1: Sara Parker and Ethics

 

One of the reasons there can be so much debate about ethical issues is because ethics are opinions informed by people's values and people have different values. People can disagree about whether or not something is unethical, and, oftentimes, there is no right answer. In order to make decisions about what may be ethical or unethical, Yegidis (2012, p. 29) suggests focusing on these three questions:

 

            "Who should benefit or suffer from the actions of the researcher?"

 

            "Whose rights should take priority over those of others?"

 

 

            "Does the end (increased knowledge) justify the means (the methods used to acquire it and their potential for harm)?"

 

For this Discussion, view the Sessions episode on the Parker family. As you do so, consider which, if any, ethical mandates or standards were violated.

 

·      Post a response explaining your reaction to the Parker episode.
 
·      Be sure to address whether or not the social worker violated any ethical mandates or standards.
 
·      Also explain which strategies could have been used to guide ethical practice.

 


 ·      Finally, describe the responsibility of the social workers in the Parker case.

 

Please use the resources to support your answers.

 

 

References

 

Laureate Education. (Producer). (2013).Parker Family [Video File]. In Sessions.

 

Labott, S. M., & Johnson, T. P. (2004). Psychological and social risks of behavioral research. IRB: Ethics & Human Research, 26(3), 11–15.

           

Nicotera, N., & Walls, N. E. (2010). Challenging perceptions of academic research as bias free: Promoting a social justice framework in social work research methods courses. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 30(3), 334–350.

           

 

 

 

Parker Family Episode 4

Program Transcript

 

SOCIAL WORKER: Well, I think we should wrap things up. Does this same time

work for you next week?

 

SARA: Yes, it's fine.

 

SOCIAL WORKER: Let me give you an appointment card. By the way, something occurred to me that might interest you. I have a colleague that's doing a study on the impact of hoarding on family members. She wants to identify potential interventions. I think she'd love to talk to you and Stephanie.

 

SARA: Talk to me?

 

SOCIAL WORKER: She's paying participants in her study. I don't know how much.

 

SARA: Do I have to do it? I-- I just don't like people knowing my business.

 

SOCIAL WORKER: It's totally confidential and anonymous.

 

SARA: I don't know.

 

SOCIAL WORKER: I think it'd be a great opportunity for you.

 

SARA: I don't know. Would she have to come see my home? I mean, I don't like people seeing how I live.

 

SOCIAL WORKER: Don't worry about that. You should at least talk to her. Like I

 said, there's some money in it for you. Can I give her your number?

 

THE END

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion 2: The Research Approval Process

 

The early years of the 20th century were host to a number of unethical research studies. Research involving the way that a young child reacts to and generalizes fear responses, medical experiments conducted in concentration camps, and observing the way people respond to authority were just a few of the most famous experiments whose byproduct was placing clients in physical pain and/or mental anguish. Since then, it has been recognized that research subjects need to be protected from the flagrant disregard of researchers. This week, you consider the guidelines in Walden University's Institutional Review Board (IRB) document, "Research Ethics FAQs for Doctoral Students in the Clinical/Intervention Fields: Practical Tips for Avoiding Delays and Problems in the Research Approval Process."

 

 ·      Post a description of two ways the guidelines in Walden University's IRB document may impact the selection of a research population, research setting, and/or research design. (https://waldencfe.adobeconnect.com/irb/)

 

Please use the resources to support your answer.

 

References

 

Labott, S. M., & Johnson, T. P. (2004). Psychological and social risks of behavioral research. IRB: Ethics & Human Research, 26(3), 11–15.

           


Nicotera, N., & Walls, N. E. (2010). Challenging perceptions of academic research as bias free: Promoting a social justice framework in social work research methods courses. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 30(3), 334–350.

                        Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

 

Walden University (n.d.). Academic Guides: Research Ethics & Compliance: Welcome from the IRB. Retrieved September 12, 2016, from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/researchcenter/orec

 

 

 

 

Discussion 3:

 

 Refer to the topics covered in this week's resources and incorporate them into your blog.

 

Post a blog post that includes:

 

·      An explanation of potential challenges in adhering to confidentiality in your field education experience 

 

·      A description of agency policies or mandates with regard to confidentiality
 
 ·      An explanation of potential challenges in communicating with clients within your agency

 

Be sure to support your blog posts with specific references to this week's resources.

 

References

 

Garthwait, C. (2012). The social work practicum: A guide and workbook for students (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

 

Saxon, C., Jacinto, G. A., & Dziegielewski, S. F. (2006). Self-determination and confidentiality: The ambiguous nature of decision-making in social work practice. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment13(4), 55–72.

           


Wulff, D. P., St George, S. A., & Besthorn, F. H. (2011). Revisiting confidentiality: observations from family therapy practice. Journal of Family Therapy33(2), 199–214.

                        

    • Posted: 3 years ago
    • Due: 
    • Budget: $15
    Answers 1

    Purchase the answer to view it

    blurred-text