Marijuana should be illegal

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Marijuana should be Illegal

Legalization of marijuana remains a continuous issue in the society.  The debate as to whether or not the substance should be legalized has been marked by controversies. The contentions emanate from the differences held by various sections of the society on the use and the benefits of the substance. While the proponents for the legalization of marijuana mainly cite its medicinal values and recreational benefits, those who promote illegalization of the drug cite different health and social problems that stem from its use. According to the group, marijuana brings more health complications and socioeconomic problems similar to other hard drugs (Thomas David & Rashid 363). Although some claim that marijuana should be legalized it should be illegal because it has negative health effects it is a gateway drug, it is not a legitimate form of medicine, it is addictive, & people are more likely to have accidents in states where it is legal.

A stance taken by Thomas, David & Rashid reveals that marijuana use continues to increase in a country such as Canada despite the health problems associated with the substance. The drug is a highly addictive chemical that has a higher chance of being abused than other substances such as tobacco and alcohol. It dominates the lives of the abusers and presents various challenges to them. “Marijuana abuse is more common than other drugs of the same category (Thomas David & Rashid 362)”. This quote the authors have said is saying that more drugs are more common than other drugs,  For instance, drug use is mainly common among the young adult males than females. The authors deduced their conclusions from a study in Canada that compared addiction to Marijuana and other drugs. The results indicated young males were at higher risk of abusing the substance than female. The youths who participated in the study had poor academic performance than other students who did not use the substance.  “Marijuana promotes underage consumption of drugs and involvement in illegal activities” (Thomas David & Rashid 367). This quote shows that more underage promotion happens not only for adults, this proves my point as more children are getting affected not just adult.

The use of the drug among young adults is likely to influence the consumption of other dangerous substances such as cocaine and heroin. The authors assumed that most adolescents and young adults who abuse cocaine must have started with marijuana abuse. The addiction for the drug enhances consumption of other substances among the youths. Marijuana addiction increases the curiosity to acquire and abuse other drugs. Desinome contends to the above argument and supports his assertions with the economic opinion of addiction. According to the theory, a drug abuser with addictive behaviors is likely to increase the consumption rate up to a point in which the stock is no longer useful to the individual. The person will, therefore, search for alternative means to satisfy the identified gap. “The past usage trends are likely to influence the current and future desires for alternative types of drugs” (Desinome 149).

Apart from the promoting cases of drug abuse and poor academic performance among the youths, marijuana has no medicinal value as always propagated by the legalization proponents. The drug has been historically associated with the ability to cure various diseases and ailments such as cancer and glaucoma. Nonetheless, these medicinal benefits have not been proved scientifically or subjected to serious peer review. This stance elicits the differences between various states in America on the medical legalization. Medical marijuana laws in different states have not properly defined and entrenched into the legislative system to conform to the federal requirements.  “The medicinal benefits on the drug are based on mere hearsays and wild assumptions that do not merit scientific evidence” (Desinome 150).

Medical legalization debate remains as contentious as the recreational legalization. The individuals who are anti-illegalization believe that marijuana has immense recreational benefits that include the ability to remove stress and anxiety. The advocates for the recreational legalization highlight how marijuana produces certain chemicals and alpha waves that are important in reducing stress and solving issues such as loneliness. The drug increases the capacity of the brain to produce stress relieving chemicals and help in the elimination of emotional discomforts. While these advocates base their position on the subject of chemical reactions, the most serious concern touches on safety of recreational legalization. The recreational points are self defeating because of the damages that the drug causes to the brain and other important body organs such as the lungs and the liver. Consumption of the substance interferes with free circulation of blood in such organs. Marijuana use has been associated with worsening mental health among the abusers. It also enhances the prevalence of heart complications. For instance, after the abuse of the drug, the heart rate can increase by more than 80%. “The situation influences the occurrence of arrhythmias and palpitations” (Desinome 150).

The individuals who support recreational legalization tend to ignore security and health concerns associated with the drug. The advocates do embrace the social problems that emanate from the consumption of the drug. For example, marijuana abuse among the adolescents and young adults is the main cause of delinquent activities. Youth involvement in illegal acts such as robbery, violence, and rape stems from drug addiction. Nonetheless, most of the youths who use marijuana are more likely to engage in robbery or any violent activity than those who abuse alcohol. Other than delinquent behaviors, the consumption of the substance influences the occurrence of other social problems such as road accidents. In this line of argument, Anderson, Benjamin and Daneil compared the occurrence of road accidents in states where the substance was legalized and those regions where the drug was completely illegal. “The study targeted both young and older adults who abused the substance” (Anderson, Benjamin & Daneil 333).

According to the findings of the study, it was evident that accidents were higher in states that had legalized the abuse than those that did not legalize the drug. Accident occurrence in the latter states was associated with lack of proper control policies that regulate drug consumption and driving. The findings indicate significance of drug control policies on issues such as road accidents and social violence. Despite the fact that legalization may help in the control of traffic fatalities, there is no evidence that such an initiative can be effective without the existence of drug control policies. “Drug control measures play an important role in reducing such problems and encouraging responsible behavior among the citizens of a country” (Anderson, Benjamin & Daneil 335)

The effectiveness of regulation policies in reducing fatalities that stem from drug abuse addresses safety concerns ignored by the legalization advocates. The proponents for legalization also ignore the healthcare and economic costs associated with consumption of the drug. In America, healthcare costs related to drug abuse increase the cost of health services and exert intense pressure on such amenities. The country could eliminate the problem if all states illegalize the drug to reduce its consumption. Additionally, marijuana abuse attracts serious financial problems to the abusers and their families. Money that could have been spent in worthwhile economic activities is intentionally directed to the procurement of the drug. There are many families that have separated because of the social problems that result marijuana abuse. Based on these facts, it is evident that the supporters for marijuana legalization lack an appealing case and substantial evidence to present their concerns. The group focuses on reliable evidence to support the legalization of the substance on the basis of medicinal ground, recreational purpose, and perceived economic benefits. Such grounds do not take into account the health problems, safety and security concerns, and socioeconomic problems of the drug. “Marijuana should be illegalized to discourage its use and cultivation” (Anderson, Benjamin & Daneil Rees 336).

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

Anderson, Mark, Benjamin Hansen & Daneil Rees. 

            Medical Marijuana Laws, Traffic Fatalities, and Alcohol Consumptiion. Journal of Law & Economics 56.2(2013): 333-369.

Desinome Jeffrey. Is Marijuana a Gateway Drug. 

           Eastern Journal 24.2(1998). 149-164

Thomas Scott, L. David Hammond & Rashid Ahmed. 

            Alcohol, Marijuana, and Tobacco Use Patterns among Youth in Canada. Cancer Causes & Control, 19.4(2008): 361-369.

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