This is a Huge Project that needs to be completed by Saturday Evening. Please Fully read the Instructions. I will Provide the additional parts and reference documents

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Resources: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, final project charter and final project plan

Write a 1,400- to 2,100-word Project Implementation Plan for the project selected by the Learning Team in Week 2 which will also be used for the final implementation plan for the Project Selection Paper Assignment. Part 1 of the plan must include the following sections:

  • Human Resources Plan: Complete the human resources plan for the project as defined in section 9.1.3 (Develop Human Resources Plan) in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. This plan should include roles and responsibilities, a project organization chart, and a staffing management plan. Your plan should:
    • Analyze the roles and responsibilities in the following areas: Role, Authority, Responsibility, and Competency which are needed to complete a project.
    • Create a project organization chart that displayed project team members and their reporting relationships.
    • Create a staffing management plan that included how human resource management requirements will be met by including when and how project team members will be acquired and how long they will be needed.
  • Quality Management Plan: Complete the quality management plan as defined in section 8.1.3 (Plan Quality: Outputs) in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. This plan should include the quality management plan for implementing the organization's quality policy and the quality metrics. Your plan should:
    • Examine how the organization's quality policies will be implemented.
    • Examine how the project management team plans to meet the quality requirements set for the project.
  • Procurement Plan: Complete the procurement plan as defined in section 12.1.3.1, titled Procurement Management Plan, in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. This plan should identify the types of external resources that must be secured, the process for selecting and managing these external resources, and the metrics to evaluate the external resources. Your plan should:
    • Examine how a project team will acquire goods and services from outside the performing organization.
    • Examine how the procurement processes will be managed from developing procurement documents through contract closure.

Format your paper consistent with APA guidelines. Tables may be used to format and organize the implementation plan. They can be included within the plan rather than at the end as normally required by APA guidelines.

 

 

 

 

9.1.3: Plan Human Resource Management: Outputs

9.1.3.1: Human Resource Management Plan

The human resource management plan, a part of the project management plan, provides guidance on how project human resources should be defined, staffed, managed, and eventually released. The human resource management plan and any subsequent revisions are also inputs into the Develop Project Management Plan process.

The human resource management plan includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  •  Roles and responsibilities. The following should be addressed when listing the roles and responsibilities needed to complete a project:
    •  Role. The function assumed by or assigned to a person in the project. Examples of project roles are civil engineer, business analyst, and testing coordinator. Role clarity concerning authority, responsibilities, and boundaries should also be documented.
    •  Authority. The right to apply project resources, make decisions, sign approvals, accept deliverables, and influence others to carry out the work of the project. Examples of decisions that need clear authority include the selection of a method for completing an activity, quality acceptance, and how to respond to project variances. Team members operate best when their individual levels of authority match their individual responsibilities.
    •  Responsibility. The assigned duties and work that a project team member is expected to perform in order to complete the project’s activities.
    •  Competency. The skill and capacity required to complete assigned activities within the project constraints. If project team members do not possess required competencies, performance can be jeopardized. When such mismatches are identified, proactive responses such as training, hiring, schedule changes, or scope changes are initiated.
  •  Project organization charts. A project organization chart is a graphic display of project team members and their reporting relationships. It can be formal or informal, highly detailed or broadly framed, based on the needs of the project. For example, the project organization chart for a 3,000-person disaster response team will have greater detail than a project organization chart for an internal, twenty-person project.
  •  Staffing management plan. The staffing management plan is a component of the human resource management plan that describes when and how project team members will be acquired and how long they will be needed. It describes how human resource requirements will be met. The staffing management plan can be formal or informal, highly detailed, or broadly framed, depending upon the needs of the project. The plan is updated continually during the project to direct ongoing team member acquisition and development actions. Information in the staffing management plan varies by application area and project size, but items to consider include:
    •  Staff acquisition. A number of questions arise when planning the acquisition of project team members. For example, whether the human resources come from within the organization or from external, contracted sources; whether the team members need to work in a central location or may work from distant locations; costs associated with each level of expertise needed for the project; and level of assistance that the organization’s human resource department and functional managers are able to provide to the project management team.
    •  Resource calendars. Calendars that identify the working days and shifts on which each specific resource is available. The staffing management plan describes necessary time frames for project team members, either individually or collectively, as well as when acquisition activities such as recruiting should start. One tool for charting human resources is a resource histogram, used by the project management team as a means of providing a visual representation or resources allocation to all interested parties. This chart illustrates the number of hours a person, department, or entire project team that will be needed each week or month over the course of the project. The chart can include a horizontal line that represents the maximum number of hours available from a particular resource. Bars that extend beyond the maximum available hours identify the need for a resource optimization strategy (Section 6.6.2.4), such as adding more resources or modifying the schedule. An example of a resource histogram is illustrated in Figure 9-6.

      Figure 9-6. Illustrative Resource Histogram

    •  Staff release plan. Determining the method and timing of releasing team members benefits both the project and team members. When team members are released from a project, the costs associated with those resources are no longer charged to the project, thus reducing project costs. Morale is improved when smooth transitions to upcoming projects are already planned. A staff release plan also helps mitigate human resource risks that may occur during or at the end of a project.
    •  Training needs. If it is expected that the team members to be assigned will not have the required competencies, a training plan can be developed as part of the project. The plan can also include ways to help team members obtain certifications that would support their ability to benefit the project.
    •  Recognition and rewards. Clear criteria for rewards and a planned system for their use help promote and reinforce desired behaviors. To be effective, recognition and rewards should be based on activities and performance under a person’s control. For example, a team member who is to be rewarded for meeting cost objectives should have an appropriate level of control over decisions that affect expenses. Creating a plan with established times for distribution of rewards ensures that recognition takes place and is not forgotten. Recognition and rewards are part of the Develop Project Team process (Section 9.3).

 

 

8.1.3: Plan Quality Management: Outputs

8.1.3.1: Quality Management Plan

The quality management plan is a component of the project management plan that describes how the organization’s quality policies will be implemented. It describes how the project management team plans to meet the quality requirements set for the project.

The quality management plan may be formal or informal, detailed, or broadly framed. The style and detail of the quality management plan are determined by the requirements of the project. The quality management plan should be reviewed early in the project to ensure that decisions are based on accurate information. The benefits of this review can include a sharper focus on the project’s value proposition and reductions in costs and in the frequency of schedule overruns that were caused by rework.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.1.3.1: Procurement Management Plan

The procurement management plan is a component of the project management plan that describes how a project team will acquire goods and services from outside the performing organization. It describes how the procurement processes will be managed from developing procurement documents through contract closure. The procurement management plan can include guidance for:

  •  Types of contracts to be used;
  •  Risk management issues;
  •  Whether independent estimates will be used and whether they are needed as evaluation criteria;
  •  Those actions the project management team can take unilaterally, if the performing organization has a prescribed procurement, contracting, or purchasing department;
  •  Standardized procurement documents, if needed;
  •  Managing multiple suppliers;
  •  Coordinating procurement with other project aspects, such as scheduling and performance reporting;
  •  Any constraints and assumptions that could affect planned procurements;
  •  Handling the long lead times to purchase certain items from sellers and coordinating the extra time needed to procure these items with the development of the project schedule;
  •  Handling the make-or-buy decisions and linking them into the Estimate Activity Resources and Develop Schedule processes;
  •  Setting the scheduled dates in each contract for the contract deliverables and coordinating with the schedule development and control processes;
  •  Identifying requirements for performance bonds or insurance contracts to mitigate some forms of project risk;
  •  Establishing the direction to be provided to the sellers on developing and maintaining a work breakdown structure (WBS);
  •  Establishing the form and format to be used for the procurement/contract statements of work;
  •  Identifying prequalified sellers, if any, to be used; and
  •  Procurement metrics to be used to manage contracts and evaluate sellers.

A procurement management plan can be formal or informal, can be highly detailed or broadly framed, and is based upon the needs of each project.

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