Discussion Question

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Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD-5) was executed by President Bush in 2003 to encourage a more coordinated federal response to emergency situations in the United States. It is very proscriptive with regard to what is required by the federal government, and there are strong ramifications for local governments. Even school districts need a strategy to deal with HSPD-5, even though the executive order itself is federal. Some have claimed that HSPD-5 oversteps the boundaries of federalism, yet others claim that it has encouraged a more expedient and cooperative response to large scale emergencies. 

For this Discussion, consider whether or not HSPD-5 has had a direct impact on local disaster response. Then, consider whether that impact has had a beneficial, harmful, or negligible effect on domestic disaster response. Finally, consider whether or not any aspects of HSPD-5 should be changed or amended now that it has been in effect for a number of years and why.

With these thoughts in mind:

Post your position on the impact of HSPD-5, that is, do you think it is beneficial, harmful, or has little to no impact. 

Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the Learning Resources.

Readings

  • Haddow, G. D., Bullock, J. A., & Coppola, D. P. (2014). Introduction to emergency management (5th ed.). Waltham, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.
    • Chapter 6, “The Disciplines of Emergency Management: Response”
  • Office of the White House Press Secretary. (2003 February 28). Homeland security presidential directive 5: Directive on management of domestic incidents. Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, 39(10), 280–285. Retrieved from https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=439105
  • FEMA. (n.d.). NIMS resource centerRetrieved March 16, 2012, from http://www.fema.gov/national-incident-management-system
    • 5 years ago
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